Soup Du Jour! Dear Mom!

 

As a Chicken Soup co-author I’m always looking for your stories to share with everyone else.  Not too long ago I did a “call out” to my members asking for heartwarming stories and was overwhelmed with over 2500 submissions.  I know you will enjoy hearing from others so I am going to be sharing them with you on a weekly basis.  Here is one from Nicole Ongman!

 Dear Mom!
(by Micole Ongman)


I have a son Ethan, who is now 14.   He has autism and was put on the border between autism and aspergers on the spectrum by the doctor.  He is working at about a grade 1 or 2 level in school.   He is verbal and quite amusing to be around.

My mom lives in Florida and I have been sending her updates since Ethan was born so she could be a part of our day to day lives.   A few years back,  I titled them “Dear Mom” (as the emails to her said) and gave them to her as a gift one year for her birthday.

Read and enjoy!

December 12, 2002 (Ethan was 6)

We went to Walmart to buy Ethan some new winter gloves.   After we got the gloves we went to St. Cinnamon and had a hot cinnamon bun.

Since we were in the mall for a while I figured that he would have to go to the bathroom (we still have toileting issues at 14 years).   I asked Ethan and he said yes.  We went back into Walmart and found that the woman’s bathroom was out of order.

The men’s was right there and there was no one in it (I opened  the door and called in) so I sent Ethan in to pee.   A man came  to go in, he was a staff person, and he was looking at me funny because I was hovering outside the door to the men’s washroom.  I said that I was just waiting for my son.

He came right back out and said that Ethan was just standing there.  I told the man to do what he had to do and I would go in after. He said no go ahead and I went in.  As soon as I saw Ethan standing in the cubicle doorway I knew that he had either just made or was in the process of making a  poop.

I told him to get into the bathroom stall (there were about 3 urinals in there as well) and I sat him on the toilet.  He had gone a bit in his pants so I took them off while he was on the toilet.

Next thing I knew the outside door opened and in came someone to use the urinal.  There were these big boots we could see on the other side of the stall and I just put my finger to my my lips and told Ethan to “shhhh”.  He giggled, knowing that mom wasn’t supposed to be here.  I didn’t panic because I figured the man would be done before us and would be gone soon.

I got Ethan’s pants off, took off his underwear and put his clean pants back on.  He was still sitting on the toilet going to pee and in walks another man.  I shusshed Ethan again, he giggles and the man started to pee.  Then Ethan looks down and  as he’s watching himself pee, he blurts out “I have a big penis”!

Well, the peeing outside our door stops for a second and then resumes.  I am trying to contain my laughter and Ethan is giggling. Finally that man left, Ethan was done and we got him ready to go.

When we were about to open the stall door, in walks another man and I thought it wouldn’t be that long so I waited, shushing Ethan and him giggling.  While that man was in, another came in and I was starting to feel trapped in the men’s washroom.  One man left and when the other was done and was washing his hands, I opened the door and Ethan and I walked out making a beeline to the door. The guy at the sink looked but didn’t care.  Just as we got to the door, this little elderly man came in, stopped, looked at the sign on the door and looked back at me.  Before I could say anything, he just shrugged his shoulders and proceeded to go to the urinal to do his business as Ethan and I quickly escaped.

What a riot that was!!

Micole Ongman

Care for Caregivers

This is really cool! I’ve been thinking a long time about Second Life as a vehicle for people with autism to connect for a long time since social skills are a real challenge. Well lo and behold, even though this isn’t quite what I had in mind this is still really cool for caregivers (who desperately need attention too)

Check out this great concept designed exclusively for those who provide care for family members with special needs. Caregiver Village members are able to connect with friends, participate in book clubs with celebrity authors, journal, play mystery games, solve puzzles, and learn valuable information about care giving.

Authors such as Liane Kupferberg Carter, renowned journalist and author of many books including The Thinking Person’s Guide to Autism, and Dr. Cindy Ariel, a clinical psychologist specializing in therapy solutions for individuals with autism and their loved ones, will lead book club discussions on Autism and care giving.

http://www.caregivervillage.com/social-media

As a caregiver myself I love the idea and wanted to share it with you.

Karen Simmons,
Autism Todays
Founder & CEO and Mom

Contact Info

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1 in
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Diagnosed with Autism

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Autism Diagnosis a Day

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Billion per Year

Boys are
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Times More at Risk